Facebook Marketing Unleashed


Introduction


Facebook is a massive traffic monster. As of this writing, it has over 1.3 billion, with a capital B, daily active users. Consider that over 1.3 billion people use the same website on a daily basis. Furthermore, it is expanding. Also, when people are on Facebook, they tend to stay there and consume page after page of content. In fact, Facebook has slightly more than 2 billion monthly active users.


79% of all Americans use Facebook in some capacity. If that wasn't impressive enough, Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, has the highest percentage of American users.

Instagram accounts for 32% of all American usage. According to reports, 53% of US residents use Facebook several times per day. In terms of the global population, more than 22% of people use Facebook on a regular basis.


When you sign up for Facebook, you must agree to the user license agreement. Once you sign in, Facebook will monitor every like, comment, share, and page you like. It's as if, by observing your behavior, Facebook can make educated guesses about your interests.


Facebook monitors, tracks, and targets every group you join as well as your Messenger interactions. Nothing beats Facebook when it comes to fine-tuned laser targeting of demographic groups based on individual user behavior. This training will teach you the most effective ways to promote on Facebook.


Facebook Marketing – Mistakes to Avoid


Even promotion veterans make some of the most common marketing mistakes on Facebook. Even the best of us appear to be susceptible to these common blunders.


It's a good idea to become aware of these errors now if you want to save a lot of time, effort, and money later.


This will reduce the likelihood that you will make the same mistakes.


Starting Off Paid Campaigns with a Bang


Don't launch your paid campaigns with a bang. Begin with a free campaign to build your audience organically, then gather consumer intelligence before putting together an experimental paid marketing campaign.


Begin slowly and gradually. The worst thing you can do is enter with a large budget and no idea what you're doing.


Starting a Paid Campaign with an Immature Page


If your page is relatively new or there isn't much engagement, you might want to postpone a paid campaign. Simply put, you don't have enough target audience profiling data to launch a successful paid campaign.


Using Mass Content Posters with Discovery Tools


Many marketers use a one-size-fits-all Facebook mass promotion tool. They would find various Facebook groups and pages and then use this tool to spam those areas.


Don't do it. When you do this, you are not doing your brand any favors. What you're really doing is spamming.


It's only a matter of time before you're barred!


Promoting Direct Affiliate Links or Direct Sales Page Links


You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. Similarly, you can get a lot of people to click on your links on Facebook, but don't expect them to convert once they get to that affiliate sales page or your own direct sales page.


Why aren't people buying? After all, they did click on your advertisement, didn't they? The answer is that they have not been properly qualified. They clicked out of curiosity in many cases. Perhaps they clicked by accident.


Whatever the case may be, you did not make a sale!


Direct links should not be posted. You must gain confidence. You must first establish trust.


Pulling Random Content and Curating Them Based Solely on Keywords


You can't just set up Facebook publication tools to pull any and all content from Facebook that has anything to do with your keywords and then blast it out. When you do that, you are simply spamming.


You must be very deliberate and cautious about the type of content you associate with your brand, whether curated or not.


Rotating and Republishing the Same Content Over and Over Again


Have you ever gone to a Facebook page and noticed that all of the content has been reposted multiple times on the same day?


The idea behind this practice is that the more Facebook audience members see the content, the more likely they are to click through.


You appear to be repeatedly spamming your page fans. Don't be surprised if they dislike your page.


Wholesale "Optimization" of Ads


Paid ads are another common rookie mistake on Facebook. If you notice that one of your ads is simply not performing, it's tempting to simply create a new ad by completely replacing the ad with something completely different.


When you do this, you have no idea which part of the new ad is working or not. You're basically shooting in the dark. If the performance of your ad improves, you have no idea what caused the improvement.


You must have a strategy or method in place that allows you to track where the increase in click-through and, ultimately, conversion rates is coming from.


Simply swapping out ads in total or in part does not provide you with the information you need to make informed decisions.


Copy and Paste Competitor Ad Strategy


Some marketers are so lazy that they will simply look at their competitors' ads and copy them. Of course, they won't copy word for word, but they'll still fail.


How come? Your competitors, on the other hand, have spent a lot of money optimizing the ads that they're showing. Their advertisements work. However, if you copy them word for word, you will not gain a competitive advantage.


You can't simply copy someone else's advertisement without knowing what you're doing. Indeed, only a portion of your competitor's ads is effective.


You don't know what portion that is if you don't know what you're doing, so you're basically taking a wild stab at designing your ad. You might be saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, or the right thing to the wrong people. You fail.


Quitting Paid Marketing Too Early


Many inexperienced Facebook marketers have a one-time, big-time mentality. They've heard how valuable Facebook traffic is, so they set aside some of their hard-earned money to run an ad campaign. If the campaign fails to meet their expectations, they are too quick to abandon Facebook ads altogether.


Just because things aren't going well doesn't mean you have to abandon the project entirely. You can pause certain campaigns and launch new ones while maintaining the same budget. You can make changes to your existing campaigns.


Failing Like a Huge Train Wreck


Have you ever seen a train wreck in slow motion? It's sad because it's all too predictable, but you can't turn your head and ignore it.


You're curious about what's going to happen next. You know what's going to happen in the back of your mind, but it's so slow and massive that you can't help but look.


The same can be said for your Facebook marketing campaign. You know the campaign is failing, but you can't pinpoint the reason, so you just go through the motions like a deer caught in headlights.


Why not learn how to fail quickly instead?


Learn to fail quickly on a small budget. It's okay if the vast majority of your experiments are failures. Consider yourself in situations where these errors are likely to occur. Prepare a backup plan in case you make one of these mistakes, and learn how to spot them.


Most Effective Ways to Market on Facebook


Even promotion veterans make some of the most common marketing mistakes on Facebook.


Even the best of us appear to be susceptible to these common blunders.


It's a good idea to become aware of these errors now if you want to save a lot of time, effort, and money later. This will reduce the likelihood that you will make the same mistakes.


Starting Off Paid Campaigns with a Bang


Don't launch your paid campaigns with a bang. Begin with a free campaign to build your audience organically, then gather consumer intelligence before putting together an experimental paid marketing campaign.


Begin slowly and gradually. The worst thing you can do is enter with a large budget and no idea what you're doing.


Starting a Paid Campaign with an Immature Page


If your page is relatively new or there isn't much engagement, you might want to postpone a paid campaign. Simply put, you don't have enough target audience profiling data to launch a successful paid campaign.


Using Mass Content Posters with Discovery Tools


Many marketers use a one-size-fits-all Facebook mass promotion tool. They would find various Facebook groups and pages and then use this tool to spam those areas.


Don't do it. When you do this, you are not doing your brand any favors. What you're really doing is spamming.


It's only a matter of time before you're barred!


Promoting Direct Affiliate Links or Direct Sales Page Links


You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink. Similarly, you can get a lot of people to click on your links on Facebook, but don't expect them to convert once they get to that affiliate sales page or your own direct sales page.


Why aren't people buying? After all, they did click on your advertisement, didn't they? The answer is that they have not been properly qualified. They clicked out of curiosity in many cases. Perhaps they clicked by accident.


Whatever the case may be, you did not make a sale!


Direct links should not be posted. You must gain confidence. You must first establish trust.


Pulling Random Content and Curating Them Based Solely on Keywords


You can't just set up Facebook publication tools to pull any and all content from Facebook that has anything to do with your keywords and then blast it out. When you do that, you are simply spamming.

You must be very deliberate and cautious about the type of content you associate with your brand, whether curated or not.


Wholesale "Optimization" of Ads


Paid ads are another common rookie mistake on Facebook. If you notice that one of your ads is simply not performing, it's tempting to simply create a new ad by completely replacing the ad with something completely different.


When you do this, you have no idea which part of the new ad is working or not. You're basically shooting in the dark. If the performance of your ad improves, you have no idea what caused the improvement.


You must have a strategy or method in place that allows you to track where the increase in click-through and, ultimately, conversion rates is coming from.


Simply swapping out ads in total or in part does not provide you with the information you need to make informed decisions.


Copy and Paste Competitor Ad Strategy


Some marketers are so lazy that they will simply look at their competitors' ads and copy them. Of course, they won't copy word for word, but they'll still fail.


How come? Your competitors, on the other hand, have spent a lot of money optimizing the ads that they're showing. Their advertisements work. However, if you copy them word for word, you will not gain a competitive advantage.


You can't simply copy someone else's advertisement without knowing what you're doing. Indeed, only a portion of your competitor's ads is effective.


You don't know what portion that is if you don't know what you're doing, so you're basically taking a wild stab at designing your ad. You might be saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, or the right thing to the wrong people. You fail.


Quitting Paid Marketing Too Early


Many inexperienced Facebook marketers have a one-time, big-time mentality. They've heard how valuable Facebook traffic is, so they set aside some of their hard-earned money to run an ad campaign. If the campaign fails to meet their expectations, they are too quick to abandon Facebook ads altogether.


Just because things aren't going well doesn't mean you have to abandon the project entirely. You can pause certain campaigns and launch new ones while maintaining the same budget. You can make changes to your existing campaigns.


Failing Like a Huge Train Wreck


Learn to fail quickly on a small budget. Consider yourself in situations where mistakes are likely to occur. Prepare a backup plan in case you make one of these mistakes, and learn how to spot them. It's okay if the vast majority of your experiments are failures.


What is Facebook Page Marketing?


Setting up a fan page for your business, brand, or cause is one of the most obvious ways to market on Facebook. Facebook actively promotes this website feature.


What it doesn't tell you is that Facebook has been actively modifying its algorithm to the point where you'll need to have extremely popular content in order to reach the majority of people who have expressed interest in whatever you're promoting.


Simply put, not everyone who liked your page will see your updates. In fact, in most cases, only a subset of those people will see your updates.


Unfortunately, Facebook is actively working to limit your free traffic exposure until you can demonstrate that your content is extremely popular among your page's fans.


The following are the steps you should take to market on Facebook:


Step #1: Find your competitors on Facebook


The first thing you should do is avoid reinventing the wheel. You should avoid attempting to figure things out on a hit-or-miss basis.


Reverse engineer your competitors instead.


Allow them to complete your homework for you. How?


So, find them on Facebook and observe what they are doing.


Step #2: Get the "industry standard" look and come up with your own take


Every industry has a standard social media profile, brand appearance, and content strategy. The sooner you realize this, the sooner you will be on your way to social media marketing success on Facebook.


The longer you wait to learn this, the more you will struggle.


As a social media strategist, your job is to research the industry standard look, content strategy, and other elements and create your own spin on them. They are unlikely to like your page if they cannot make sense of your social media brand. It may appear strange to them because it deviates from the "industry standard".


Step #3: Reverse engineer your competitors' content strategy and curate.


Many business owners would post "hot content" on their social media accounts and blogs.


Unfortunately, nine times out of ten, that content is ignored. People do not click on it, share it, comment on it, or otherwise interact with it.


These publishers are essentially betting that their content will be well received by their target audience.

Don't do it. Instead, observe your competitors' actions and look for patterns.


If you notice that your competitors are consistently sharing content on the same theme or topic, they may be onto something. They wouldn't waste all this time, effort, and energy talking about the same topics over and over again unless it connected with their audience on some level and produced results.


Examine how many times that piece of content was shared or liked to confirm this. This should provide you with objective evidence that this content is appealing to your target audience members.


When you reverse engineer your competitors, you're essentially replicating their strategy in order to reach the same eyeballs that you're attempting to reach. This also applies to content curation, when you take content published by others and promote it on your social media platform.


Once you have a sufficient number of page likes, you can begin sharing your own content, which will drive traffic to your website.


Step #4: Pick the best performing or most popular type of content, and scale up


For a few weeks, post content. Continue to publish, and then examine the content that receives the most engagement. Which shared materials are the most popular? Who has the most shares? Who received the most feedback?


You'll eventually ignore other types of content in favor of the ones that perform the best.


For example, if you have a Chihuahua Facebook page and notice that third-party articles on Chihuahua houses receive a lot of shares, likes, and comments, you might want to eliminate most other types of content and focus on Chihuahua houses because they receive the most love from your audience.


Step #5: Come up with your own version


Create your own take on winning content. For example, you may be aware that Chihuahua houses are popular on your page. Create your own articles on the subject.

These articles, of course, direct traffic to your blog or online store. These must be of the same or higher quality than your third-party content.


Take note of how your curated popular content discusses the topic and uses the same style but delivers something better.


Perhaps you should provide more information, more recent information, or blog posts with multimedia elements such as videos and graphics. Whatever you need to do, create content that completely outperforms all of the other content on your page.


Step #6: Promotions: photo tagging by your users


This is a method of free promotion. Inform your page fans that you will be providing them with a digital freebie.


Perhaps it will be a graphic badge, or you will mention their name in a post, or you will provide them with a free eBook or free software. In any case, tell people who like your page to tag their friends in photos you're going to post.


The more photo tags you have, the more likely it is that you will receive a lot more page likes and Facebook clicks. You are not required to offer any money. It's far preferable to provide specialized graphic or digital goodies, such as a free book or booklet.


Step #7: Promotions: comments by your users


Apply the same rules as in Step 6, but instead of tagging photos, ask your page fans to leave comments. It would also be extremely beneficial if the comment contained the names of people on the commenter's friends list.


I'll leave it up to you to figure out how to make this. However, the more tags in the comments and the more engaging the comments, the more popular your posts will become.


Step #8: Call your users to action


If you have people who have already liked your page, send them occasional reminders to invite their friends.


Birds of a feather flock together, so this works. Seriously. The main reason you became friends with people in the first place is that you share similar interests.


People who have similar interests tend to gravitate toward one another. Use this to your advantage by encouraging your page fans to invite their friends.


Step #9: Use Insights to promote your page


I would go through Steps 1 through 8 as thoroughly as possible before proceeding to Step 9. Step 9 will require you to pay money to promote your page.


After a few months, you can promote your page using Facebook's powerful audience profiling system, "Insights." You will be aware of the appropriate demographic, as well as the appropriate posts and content to promote.


Step #10: Boost your most popular content


Find people who aren't already fans of your page by using Facebook's lookalike audience system. This feature of Facebook's ad system allows you to reach new audiences who have similar interests to those who have already shown interest in your page.


You're essentially using Facebook's extremely powerful demographic and interest targeting system to attract new visitors to your page. This may result in more likes, which may result in more readers of your content.


You can then run targeted ads from there.


What is Facebook Group Marketing?


One of the most effective ways to market on Facebook is through its group feature. Given what's been going on with Facebook's algorithm for its Facebook pages, it's a good idea to have your own.


As a backup, join a Facebook group.


Although Facebook has reduced the amount of organic traffic it sends to Facebook pages, having a page is still worthwhile because it provides audience insights. Another great advantage of having a page is that you can copy and paste content from that page into Facebook groups.


The primary advantage of having a Facebook group is visibility. Facebook has stated that they are modifying its Facebook page to reward genuine engagement. When people see your content in a group, they can see not only the content but also a "like" button and gain a new Facebook fan.


The Problem with Facebook Groups


While Facebook groups have a high level of visibility, it is dependent on activity.


If an individual group member is not very active in your group, perhaps by not liking or commenting, they will not receive as many likes or comments.


Notifications on their Facebook updates section than an active user.


This is a significant disadvantage.


The vast majority of people who join your Facebook group will not be active. They are only present to read information. They're only there to take a look at what you have to offer.


Here's how you promote using your own FB group


Create Your Own Groups After Your Pages Mature


The first thing you should know is that you should only create a Facebook group after your page has matured. You want to know who your Facebook audience is. You won't know that until you have a page up.


Take note of the audience's insights. The data set generated by the analytics section of your Facebook management dashboard will tell you who to target.


Once you have a sufficient number of users, which will vary depending on your niche, you should create your group. Your group should be as close to your page as possible.


Use your Facebook group to extend the brand you're building with your Facebook fan page. Put the same logo there if you have one and the same motto or slogan on both. Give your group members a reason to follow you on as many different Facebook pages as possible.


Market to Other Groups


The most important aspect of Facebook group marketing is this. Because simply creating your own group as a supplemental source of traffic for your page is unlikely to result in significant growth. You must go to other groups that have already done a good job of attracting the eyeballs that you desire.


These groups must be a good fit for your niche. Go to those locations to establish yourself as a credible poster. This means you shouldn't just send the same content that's on your page to these groups. Spend time with them to help them become a local expert or credible authorities. It's not difficult. People sit up and take notice if you are the first person to always comment, and your comments are always insightful or bring new information to the table. People will give you the benefit of the doubt if you share content that clearly comes from your page.


Respond to comments made on your posts. This teaches your readers that you are approachable, accessible, and genuinely want to help them. If you just drop a link and then disappear, you are not a member of the community. You're obviously not there to add to people's lives.


My Most Important Tip


After sharing high-quality third-party content that you do not share in groups on your page, pay close attention to your page's Audience Insight. Find your most popular piece of content. Look for third-party content that is similar to that and see if you get a lot of positive feedback when you share it.


If this works, then use content from your site that fits the same themes as the tried and tested popular content in the Facebook groups you're in to get page likes.


Influencer Page Outreach


Making allies is the essence of influencer page outreach. There will undoubtedly be competitors in your niche. However, some of these competitors are willing to work with you. Many will not give you the time of day, but few will see the strategic benefit of collaborating rather than competing.


There are also people on Facebook who have pages but are not competitors with you. They might even have a large following.


Here's how you can form alliances with Facebook influencers:


Step #1: Find competitors


The first step is to review your notes from when you reverse-engineered your competitors.


These people are in your industry.


After all, you studied them in order to obtain the "industry standard" content strategy, as well as the page layout and design for your own Facebook page.

Next, look for non-competitors who specialize in your niche.


There should be quite a few of these.


These aren't merchants or service providers. They are not competing for the same dollars as you. Instead, they target the same demographic as you.


Try to find as many of these as you can.


Step #2: Pay your dues by engaging


I know it's tempting at this point to simply go to a competitor's page and comment on one of their posts. You've included a link to your page or website in the comment. You then repeat this process on all of their posts.


Let me tell you something: if you do this, you will be banned. Whatever links you post will be removed. It's a complete waste of time. Don't even consider it.


You must share high-quality content that addresses a specific theme or topic in which you know your target audience members are interested. It makes no difference who wrote the content - it must be precise and provide maximum value.


As a social media entrepreneur, you must make an effort to be the "go-to" source of information in your niche. You must interact with people by answering their questions and try to mediate between them and the content they're looking for. Only a small percentage of people produce high-quality content in any type of online group communication platform.


You can also ask questions that attempt to connect multiple issues. People may be concerned about a variety of issues, and it can be very useful to tie all these together.


You must do so in a respectful manner and not come across as a hater or someone who is simply negative.


Step #3: Become credible, then reach out